2012 Plug-in Prius 100 mpg, $32,000 price tag

 

The good ole’ Prius. Toyota, instead of reinventing the wheel has made the logical next step. It will prove profitable.

 There is little doubt, even in the midst of a very slow economy, that Toyota will sell each and every one of these vehicles.

The price is reasonable, $32K, and it builds on hybrid technology that is tested on the road.

Americans know that the that the Prius will work, and for a long time. Unlike the Volt from Chevy the Prius needs no subsidy to be viable.(Though it will qualify for a $2500 tax credit it doesn’t need the credit to sell.) And unlike the Volt the Prius comes from a company that did not go bankrupt in the past 2 years.

If a $32,000 car can get 104 MPG, the Prius starts to transition from “vanity car” to just a plain old car. It becomes increasingly cost effective for the average consumer, not just the “green” consumer.

Click here for the story.

2012 Plug-in Prius 100 mpg, $32,000 price tag

 

The good ole’ Prius. Toyota, instead of reinventing the wheel has made the logical next step. It will prove profitable.

 There is little doubt, even in the midst of a very slow economy, that Toyota will sell each and every one of these vehicles.

The price is reasonable, $32K, and it builds on hybrid technology that is tested on the road.

Americans know that the that the Prius will work, and for a long time. Unlike the Volt from Chevy the Prius needs no subsidy to be viable.(Though it will qualify for a $2500 tax credit it doesn’t need the credit to sell.) And unlike the Volt the Prius comes from a company that did not go bankrupt in the past 2 years.

If a $32,000 car can get 104 MPG, the Prius starts to transition from “vanity car” to just a plain old car. It becomes increasingly cost effective for the average consumer, not just the “green” consumer.

Click here for the story.

The Rise of the “Smart City?”

 

New technologies will enable a more efficient use of resources, better movement of people and information, and hopefuly raise the quality of life in the world’s ever growing cities.

(From Thomasnet.com)

Chances are you don’t yet live in a “smart city,” since there aren’t many of them yet. But if you believe the analysts, there will be many more of them by the end of your lifetime. ABI Research predicted this week that while $8.1 billion was spent on smart city technologies in 2010, by 2016 that number is likely to reach $39.5 billion. As of today, there are 102 smart city projects worldwide, says ABI, with Europe leading the way at 38 cities, North America at 35, Asia Pacific at 21, the Middle East and Africa at six, and Latin America with two.

Click here for the story.

 

Gaming for Social Change: An In-depth Interview with Jane McGonigal

 

An interview with the author of bestselling author of Reality is Broken: Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World  

In the wake of hearing that gamers had solved a decade old riddle that had stumped the greatest minds in AIDS research I have started to think more seriously about how games might help us solve all sorts of problems.

Here is an interview in Forbes with a woman who is not only thinking about these issues, she’s creating games that may solve problems.

(From Forbes)

(Jane McGonigal) is making games powered by the science of positive emotion and social connection. The company’s first game, SuperBetter, is designed to increase resilience in the face of any illness or injury, or health and wellness goal. Players have used SuperBetter to overcome concussions, get through chemotherapy, reduce stress, lose weight, and quit smoking. Clinical trials for the game begin in September at Ohio State University Medical Research Center.

Click here for the interview.

 

Tomato plants stacked 5 high. Potatoes floating in a hydroponic stew of nutrients. The urban farmer.

Urban farming on the next level.

Urban farming at least on a small scale is an idea who’s time has come for sure.

From Brooklyn to the Bay Area farming in the city has sprouted (sorry) up all over the place. There are even farmers markets I am told that sell only food grown on urban “farms.”

This can only be a good thing. Eating your food as close to the source as possible is a pretty good idea both for you and for the planet. It really is kind of silly that we eat strawberries grown in Argentina.

But taking urban farming to the commercial level is a different kind of challenge than getting hipster foodies to eat homegrown eggplant.

Click here for the piece in ecomagination.com on urban farming.

 

 

Two in Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, possibly killed for using social media to report crime

 

Social media in a drug war.

 

In Mexico, the drug war that rages on has chilled traditional reporting. Reporters have been killed all over the country for shining light what some would prefer to keep hidden. Now it seems that the drug lords, and who knows who else, are taking issue with those who expose them in social media.

2 people were recently found hanged with a note pinned to them warning of any further reporting of sensitive activities by citizens in social media.

“That will happen to all of them,” Read the message.

Click here for the story in CSMonitor.com

Diplomatic Cables Reveal Microsoft’s “Win-Win” Deal with Tunisian Police State

 

With more communication comes more communication tracking.

(From DissidentVoice.org)

“In July, CNET News disclosed that “Microsoft has collected the locations of millions of laptops, cell phones, and other Wi-Fi devices around the world and makes them available on the Web.”

According to researchers, “the vast database available through Live.com publishes the precise geographical location, which can point to a street address and sometimes even a corner of a building, of Android phones, Apple devices, and other Wi-Fi enabled gadgets.”

Moves by the secret state to compile geolocational directories of cell phone users, ready made databases perfect for hauling in political dissidents as was done in Bahrain, are not solely the province of repressive, Middle Eastern governments.”

Click here for the story.